Course Descriptions

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Service Learning Courses at Lane

For current course listings, please select term: Summer | Fall | Winter | Spring

Courses are currently under review, see courses below for past offerings.

All Course Descriptions:

BA 195 – Service & Ethics in Business
Instructors: Jamie Kelsch & Chris Culver
Terms offered: Fall, Winter, Spring
This capstone course is an opportunity for students to explore the role of business concepts and skills in the social economy. Students will gain insights into the application of common business skills and experience in organizations. Each student will participate in an administrative service learning experience for up to 15 hours during the term and share their experience with peers through reflective presentations and papers. Students will also attend a series of seminars and workshops. May be offered through Distance Learning.
Required

BI 101I - Botanical Beginnings
Instructor: Gail Baker
Term offered: Winter
Learn about the foundational role plants play in our lives by studying plant structures, cells, chemistry, energy pathways, cell division, and genetics. Includes lab work and some field activities, including opportunities for service learning with a variety of local organizations doing habitat restoration in the Eugene area.
Extra Credit

BI 102H - Forest Biology
Instructors: Gail Baker or Pat Boleyn
Terms offered: Fall, Winter
Explore plant and animal life cycles in our Pacific Northwest forests. Class activities have included numerous field trips to local natural forest ecosystems, including old growth. Service learning may take place at Mt. Pisgah Arboretum, Buford Park, and other local areas.
Extra Credit

BI 103F - Wildflowers of Oregon
Instructor: Gail Baker
Term offered: Spring
Our region's flowering plants and their habitats provide the framework to learn about plant diversity, ecological and evolutionary processes. Students will study flower characteristics to aid in identification and how natural selection explains why there are so many different kinds of plants and animal species in the world with such diverse and interesting life styles. Field trips to a diversity of local ecosystems enhance the study of natural history, and habitat conservation and restoration efforts.
Extra Credit

BI 103J - Forest Ecology
Instructor: Pat Boleyn
Term offered: Spring
Basic ecological and evolutionary processes and interrelationships in our local forests and their importance to humans will be explored. Identification of major trees, shrubs and wildlife through extensive field work will increase the student's awareness of ecosystems. Old Growth forest ecosystems and current forest issues will also be explored. Field trips are required.
Extra Credit

CG 199 - Be The Change: Personal Development Meets Social Change
Instructor: Lola Broomberg
Term offered: Fall
This class creates a bridge between community agencies and college students interested in making a difference. This course is devoted to facilitating social activism and community outreach through self-explorations, academic research, project design and implementation.
Required

COOP 280SL – Cooperative Education: Service Learning
Instructor: Beverly Farfan
Terms offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
This course will provide students with work experience with community partners in addressing real community needs. Students identify learning objectives and engage in reflection activities. This course is designed to promote critical thinking, problem solving, and civic engagement. In this course students develop skills, explore career options, and network with professionals while earning college credit. Instructor approval required, contact instructor to arrange dates and times. Required

HE 255 - Global Health
Instructor: Susie Cousar
Terms offered: Fall, Winter, Spring
This course will increase student's knowledge and awareness of global sustainability and the health consequences related to; poverty, social status and global economic systems. Students will explore the interconnected global issues of: consumerism, industrial globalization, maternal and child health, violence, hunger, emerging infectious disease, environmental toxins and pollution, organic and conventional agricultural practices, alternative media resources, social marketing, fair trade, biodiversity and ecosystems services, population, environmental racism and the impacts of economic, political, and social constructs on the health of our communities and planet.
Required

HS 201 - Introduction to Human Services
Instructors: Toni Fudge
Terms offered: Fall, Winter
Students will be introduced to a wide array of social and personal problems that are addressed by the field of human services. Students will explore the way economics and history shape current social welfare programs and policies. The philosophical foundation of the human service movement as well as career opportunities in the field will be examined. Trends and intervention strategies for a number of service systems will be introduced. The impact of culture and diversity on human services will be explored. Through a service learning experience, students will have the opportunity to learn first-hand about community needs and what agencies do to serve their clientele.
Required

HS 228 - HIV/AIDS & Other Infectious Diseases
Instructor: Toni Fudge
Term ofered: Spring
Introduces the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases that frequently infect people who use drugs or who are chemically dependent. Students will examine treatment options and prevention strategies. The legal and policy issues that impact infected individuals as well as the larger community will be explored.
Required

SOC 108A – Selected Topics: Women's Bodies
Instructor: Patsy Raney
Term offered: Spring
Throughout history, cultural views and practices regarding women's bodies have fundamentally affected women's experiences, position, and relative power in society. This class focuses on the embodied experiences of women, in what ways these experiences are socially constructed, and women's accommodation and resistance to those cultural constraints. Major areas of focus will include the politics of women's health, reproduction, sexuality, and body image, and will include cross-cultural information. Optional "Action projects" will be offered to incorporate Service Learning work at local agencies including SASS, Womenspace, and Ophelia's Place.
Fulfills AAOT Ethnic/Gender/Cultural Diversity requirement.


SOC 207 – Women and Work
Instructor: Patsy Raney
Term offered: Winter
Women perform nearly two-thirds of the world's work, receive one-tenth of the world's income, and own less than one-hundredth of the world's property. The class is an introduction to analysis of the issues necessary to understand women's work experience and economic position, past and present. Focus areas will include the multicultural economic and labor history of women in the US, the family and women's work, welfare/workfare issues, and women's position in the global economy.

SUST 101 – Introduction to Sustainability
Instructor: Sonja Mae
Term offered: Winter
This course will cover sustainability definitions, assessment and actions from a multidisciplinary perspective to help learners create a personal definition that will inform their actions. It will teach students how to understand the complex confluence of social systems, environmental economics, and ecological literacy. Themes of pluralism, resource conservation and systems thinking will provide the framework to analyze how to meet ones basic needs of food, water, shelter, energy, and transportations. Students will have the opportunity to do on hands-on projects.
Required

WATR 101 - Introduction to Water Resources
Instructor: Tammie Stark
Term offered: Fall
This water class provides a sociological perspective of topics including history & perception; water use; basic hydrology, water stressors at multiple scales; stormwater, wastewater & drinking water; water quality appropriate to use; water supply and demand management as well as emerging issues.
Required

WATR 105 – Water Conservation Indoor
Instructor: Tammie Stark
Term offered: Winter
This class will teach strategies to increase water conservation & efficiency at the residential, indoor level using proven water conservation strategies. The course will cover program development, water use, waste, auditing, efficiency measures & incentives as well as fixtures & appliances. Students will create & lead a community education workshop as a team.
Required

WATR 107 – Water Conservation Outdoor
Instructor: Tammie Stark
Term offered: Spring
This course will focus on conservation at the residential outdoor level including water use & waste; efficiency measures; and landscape issues such as planning & design, irrigation systems, soils, mulch & maintenance. Theoretical work will be enhanced by hands-on outdoor learning.
Required

WS 101 - Introduction to Women's Studies
Instructor: Patsy Raney
Term offered: Fall
Introductory course to the interdisciplinary field of Women's Studies, to feminism, and to the issues raised by a focus on the lives of women. Special attention will be given to the areas of work, family, sexuality, body image, gender socialization, violence against women, social and economic relations, and theories about women's oppression, authority, and power. Class discussion is central in relating readings and lectures to students' everyday lives. Participation in a weekly discussion group is required.
Optional or Extra Credit