Information Literacy and Writing Courses

Faculty Resources - English:

Information Literacy and Writing Courses

Information Literacy:  a general definition of information literacy comes from the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)

  • The definition reads:  "[the ability to] recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information"
  • Information Literacy is a targeted outcome of the Associated Arts of Oregon Transfer degree (the AAOT) in the following areas:
  • Information Literacy is already part of LCC's core abilities:
    "demonstrate general information literacy:  critically analyze, synthesize and evaluate various forms of information including written texts and other media"
  • Our writing courses address information literacy in the following ways:
  • WR 115
    1. Use reading and writing for college-level inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating;
    2. Objectively summarize source material;
    3. Select appropriate methods for developing ideas in paragraphs and essays, such as analysis, facts, explanations, examples, descriptions, quotations, and/or narratives;
    4. Weave a relevant quotation from source material into an essay;
    5. Use MLA quoting conventions.
  • WR 121
    1. Read actively and rhetorically: engage with complex ideas in order to evaluate and interpret texts;
    2. Evaluate, use, and synthesize sources in support of the thesis, which may include primary and secondary, and found in media-captured, electronic, live and printed forms;
    3. Develop and organize essays using logic, examples, and illustration, and research to support his/her ideas;
    4. Engage in the research process as part of an inquiry process;
    5. Develop support using methods that may include: adequate explanatory details, sensory and narrative detail, dialogue, examples, illustrations, reasons, analogies, and forms of evidence such as summary and synthesis of outside sources;
    6. Use a database and the Internet to locate information and evidence;
    7. Demonstrate an ability to summarize, paraphrase, and quote sources in a manner that distinguishes the writer's voice from that of his/her sources;
    8. Type and format final drafts with appropriate headings, titles, spacing, margins, demonstrating an understanding of either MLA or APA citation style.
  • WR 122
    1. Practice active reading of challenging collegelevel texts, including: annotation, cultivation/development of vocabulary, objective summary, identification and analysis of the thesis and main ideas of source material;
    2. Evaluate sources for adequacy, sound reasoning, and validity;
    3. Select the appropriate documentation style (MLA, APA, or Chicago, for example) for the topics chosen;
    4. Support conclusions with evidence by using appropriate outside sources;
    5. Develop an original thesis or claim based on the evaluation and synthesis of sources, including summary, paraphrase, and integrated quotation;
    6. Thoroughly develop and support the thesis with a balanced and insightful presentation of evidence;
    7. Use a library, online databases and the Internet to locate information and evidence;
    8. Write argumentative essays that incorporate external research and present a clear thesis;
    9. Integrate ideas and source material, being careful to differentiate between the source materials and the students' ideas and carefully credit sources and ideas.
  • WR 227
    1. Interpret, analyze, evaluate, and use various types of information, including visual and statistical information;
    2. Interpret, analyze, evaluate, and use discipline-specific sources of information;
    3. Understand potential ethical issues involved in technical and professional communication;
    4. Effectively identify information needs and methods of gathering the information that meets those needs (including discipline specific resources);
    5. Use library resources, online databases, and the internet to locate information;
    6. Evaluate information for relevance, accuracy, and reliability;
    7. Integrate and discuss information effectively, accurately, and ethically.
  • Information literacy is not a skill and habit of mind that students master after one exposure to the concept, so it's important that students are exposed to these skills repeatedly.

Last updated, K. Sullivan, 9/12/2010