Online Hybrid Classes

English Department -Composition, Literature and Film

Online Hybrid Classes

A "hybrid course" is one that meets both face-to-face (in a classroom) and online. It reduces the amount of time that would ordinarily be spent in the classroom, and requires participation in online activities and discussion as a different way of working with course topics and materials. All hybrid classes are designed to meet the same goals as their traditional classroom counterparts. Different instructors will approach hybrid classes differently, of course, but there are some things that you can expect from any hybrid course that you take in the English Department:

  1. Because of the reduced amount of face-to-face time, hybrid classes certainly allow busy students more flexibility with their schedules. However, a hybrid class does not mean less interaction with other students or less interaction with the instructor. It also does not mean less of a time commitment from either the students or the instructor. It just means that a greater amount of this interaction will take place online. In fact, you may find that you write more in a hybrid class than in a face-to-face class since a great deal of your communication with others will take the form of written posts to an online forum.
  2. If you are already familiar with web-based interaction in spaces such as discussion boards, blogs, etc., then the discussions in your hybrid writing class might feel familiar. If you are not, this does not mean that you cannot succeed in a hybrid class. In fact, it may be an opportunity for you to learn more about these modes of communication. Regardless, you should certainly be prepared to contribute to online discussions frequently and substantively.
  3. You do not need to be a highly sophisticated technology user to do well in a hybrid class. You should, however, be prepared for and interested in the following:
    • You need to be able to spend a fair amount of your out-of-class time on a computer that is connected to the internet and can browse the web.
    • You can schedule your online time when it is best for you, but you do need to be able to get online regularly (at least every other day, if not daily, is a good rule of thumb) and spend enough time online to participate meaningfully in discussions.
    • If you do not have a computer at home, you should plan to take advantage of LCC's computer labs on its main campus or learning centers (see LCC Computer Labs for locations and hours). Your schedule should allow for at least 6 hours a week in the labs if you do not have a computer at home.
    • You will need an email account registered in your name, and you will need to check it regularly. If you are using dial-up access, you should have, at a minimum, a 56K modem.
    • Basic computer skills will be helpful: sending and receiving email, finding and browsing web pages, saving attached files from an email, copying and pasting text from one program to another (from a word processor to email, for example).
    • Because a greater amount of the time applied to coursework in a hybrid class is scheduled by the student, many students find that self-discipline and self-motivation are important qualities for success, as are good time management skills (planning for and completing assignments early or on-time). In addition, you should be someone who reads and comprehends written directions well (some students prefer hearing directions to reading them).
  • If you have questions about the English Department's hybrid courses, please contact the instructor for the course you are interested in, or you may call the department at (541) 463-5419.