Facts

Downtown Campus Building Facts

Introduction
The Lane Community College Downtown Campus is a landmark project for education, business and the community. The innovative design and features of the campus will allow Lane to increase training and services, meet sustainability goals, and contribute to the regional economy.

The campus includes two connected buildings located on a half-block site in downtown Eugene, Oregon—an Academic Building providing instructional and service programs, and a Student Housing building offering apartments.

Lane is the community's college, providing comprehensive, accessible, quality, learning-centered educational opportunities to promote student success. Programs include transfer credit, career and technical training, community education, business training, and basic education. Nearly 38,000 students a year enroll at Lane.

History
Actual planning work for the downtown campus project began with a feasibility study that started in December 2009 and ended in March 2010. The college approved the result of the study and selected an architectural team to start designing the project in August 2010. Shortly thereafter a project management firm and construction manager/general contractor were hired to complete the consultant team. Various kinds of due diligence work began on the site in January 2011 and initial construction activities began in March 2011. The Downtown Campus was designed and built in a very short time period employing the construction manager, general contractor (CM/GC) method of project delivery.

Openings
Titan Court, the student housing building, opened and began leasing in September 2012, just 17 months after the start of construction.

The Academic building is scheduled to be completed in December 2012, just 21 months after the start of construction. Classes will begin January 7, 2013.

Funding
The estimated total project cost is $53.4 million. Sources:

Lane Community College Bond

$9,000,000

State of Oregon Match Bond$8,000,000
City of Eugene Contribution$8,000,000
Campus-Based Enterprise Fund$2,500,000
Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds$1,500,000
Ashlane Student Housing Settlement$851,000
Congressional Appropriation - Energy Mgmt.

$550,000

Sustainability Incentives$200,000
EWEB Greenpower Customer Grant

$100,000

New Market Tax Credits (net of fees) and/or Fundraising

$3,500,000

Bond Sale – Investment in Student Housing$19,355,000

Consultant Team

  • Project Management: Gerding Edlen
  • Architects: Robertson Sherwood Architects in association with SRG
  • Construction Manager/General Contractor: Lease Crutcher Lewis

Titan Court Housing Building Facts

Address: 975 Charnelton Street, Eugene, Oregon, 97401

Building Facts

  • Total enclosed area 89,850 square feet
  • Five floors of wood framed apartments atop a reinforced concrete ground floor podium structure
  • Meets all current building and handicapped accessibility codes as well as being earthquake resistant
  • Total cost $20 million. Direct construction cost: $14,838,000. Indirect cost include design fees, permits, etc.

Green/Sustainable Features

  • Solar-thermal array above main entrance of the academic building. This array consists of a series of water pipes enclosed in vacuum tubes exposed to ultra-violet rays from the sun. These rays heat the water which is then piped to the housing building for non-potable use as hot water.
  • High-performance building envelope. The design and insulation in the exterior walls and building roof provide a superior barrier to changes of outside temperature. This means that less heat is needed inside the building to resist cold winter temperatures and heating by high summer temperatures can be significantly reduced.
  • Triple glazed windows with solar resistant coating. The results of this glazing system are superior insulation plus reflecting much of the sun's direct rays.
  • Natural ventilation. Every room with an outside wall has a window that is operable. This includes the living/cooking/dining rooms and the bedrooms of every apartment.
  • Insulated window shades. These obviously provide more insulation than typical shades.
  • The overall effect of the above individual measures results in housing building not needing mechanical air conditioning.
  • A green roof over the meeting rooms between the academic and housing buildings adds beauty and provides thermal insulation and slows down the drainage of rainwater so that gutters and roof drains are not overburdened during downpours. This also eliminates the heat-island effect and glare caused by other types of roofing.

Support Space, Apartments and Features

  • The ground floor contains the management office, a multi-purpose activity room with kitchen facilities, an indoor bicycle storage room and a recycle room
  • The upper floors contain a total of 255 beds organized into 75 apartments including:
    • 15 studio apartments (15 beds total)
    • 5 two-bedroom/double-occupancy apartments (20 beds total)
    • 55 four-bedroom apartments (220 beds total)
      (See Residential Unit Summary below)
  • All floors are accessible by stairs and an elevator; each floor has a laundry room
  • The apartments are continuously ventilated with warm air in cold weather and cool outside air in warm weather
  • There will be at least one fully handicapped accessible apartment on each floor
  • All apartments provide wireless access to the internetAll apartments are fully furnished
  • All apartments have a living/cooking/dining area except the studios; there is a flat screen TV in the living space and a microwave, refrigerator, sink and cupboards in each cooking space
  • Access to the housing building is by card reader only
  • There are 56 interior bicycle parking stalls in addition to 74 exterior stalls for the campus and 47 indoor stalls for the Academic Building
Unit TypeQuantity / floorSingle occupancy bedroomsDouble occupancy bedroomsStudioBathsSquare feet average
A642947 sf
A1242987 sf
A2242950 sf
B1421213 sf
C121907 sf
D211272 sf
D1111303 sf
75 units15 units/flr

Additional Features

  • The multi-purpose room on the ground floor opens onto the west courtyard. This courtyard is available for student activities unless scheduled by the CML for other purposes.
  • The Titan Store and the ATM are conveniently located across the corridor from the multi-purpose room
  • An arrangement with the city allows students with cars to park in the city owned and operated parking garage across Charnelton Street.
  • The Housing building has an indoor bicycle garage that accommodates 56 bicycles. In addition, there are 47 stalls of enclosed bicycle parking for the Academic building; and 74 total exterior stalls for the campus.

Operational Information

  • The student housing building is owned by the college but managed by a private property management firm. The management firm is responsible for providing marketing, operating, maintenance and custodial services.
  • A college public safety officer is on site and responsible for providing security for both the academic and housing buildings.
  • There is one Resident Assistant/Community Advisor on each of the five floors of apartments. The RAs and property manager work closely together.

Academic Building Facts

Address: 101 West 10th Avenue, Eugene, OR 97401

Building Facts

  • Total enclosed area is 91,818 square feet
  • Building is four stories high plus a rooftop enclosure for energy management students to view HVAC and solar features
  • Construction is reinforced, post-tensioned concrete and steel frame
  • Meets all current building and handicapped access codes including fire-sprinklers and earthquake resistant structure
  • Total cost is $33,150,000. Direct construction cost is $24,312,000.

Green/Sustainable Features

  • The Academic building is designed and built to achieve the Platinum level of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green building rating system. Platinum is the highest level in the system. Building features include:
    • Geo-thermal wells. This is a ground source heating system. Pipe loops conduct water into and out of 55 wells under the buildings. Each well is 350 feet deep. The water is warmed by the wells and then is piped to heat exchangers to heat the building.
    • Passive ventilation. The building is designed to take advantage of natural airflow and the natural property of concrete mass to warm up or cool down. Outside air enters and leaves the building through windows, roof-top openings and air shafts. In the process the concrete floor masses become cooler and discharge cool temperature to the surrounding air.
    • Rainwater Harvesting. Two 10,000 gallon holding tanks (cisterns) are buried under the west courtyard. The rain that falls onto the roof is piped into the cisterns by gravity. The stored water is then pumped through other pipes to irrigate landscaped areas and used to flush toilets.
    • Automated building control system. Low voltage electronic valves, pumps and sensors control the air temperature, ventilation and lighting in rooms. The system allows the temperature, ventilation and lights in each room to be controlled by preset programs.
    • Building that teaches. One of the goals this building is designed to address is to instruct people about its sustainable and energy efficient features. This instruction is carried out by five displays: Emphasizing the solar-thermal array at the main entrance, a monitor screen in the main entry lobby that shows the current and long term use of energy and water in the building, a view of the Geo-well manifold under the floor, an above grade gauge that shows the level of rainwater in the cisterns and a green, vegetated, roof over the Center for Meeting and Learning.

Additional Features

  • Wireless connection to the internet is available throughout the entire building.
  • For added security exterior building doors and selected interior doors are equipped with card access hardware.
  • An arrangement with the city allows college employees and students to park in one of the nearby city owned and operated parking garages at low rates.
  • There are 47 interior bicycle parking stalls in addition to 74 exterior stalls for the campus and 56 interior bicycle parking stalls for the Student Housing Building
  • A 15 minute drop-off/pick-up parking stall is located on 10th Avenue in front of the main entrance to the building.
  • The Titan Store is a small convenience store open to students, staff and the general public. The store offers a variety of hot and cold, healthy snacks, school supplies and wearing apparel.
  • There is an ATM in the building.
  • The building surrounds an outside landscaped courtyard that can be enjoyed by anyone.

Instructional Programs and Services

  • The building includes 30 instructional spaces
  • The ground floor contains the following programs and services: Continuing Education, Successful Aging Institute (including Senior Companion Program), Center for Meeting and Learning conference space, classrooms, and Titan Store
  • The second floor contains these programs and services: Adult Basic and Secondary Education, English as a Second Language, Massage Therapy Program, and classrooms. In addition, eDev, a microenterprise development program, has leased space.
  • The third floor contains these programs and services: Lane Small Business Development Center, Nursing, Fashion, and classrooms
  • The fourth level contains the Energy Management program and classrooms
  • The rooftop functions as a laboratory for Energy Management students to monitor equipment
  • Previously, Center for Meeting and Learning services and Energy Management classes were not available downtown

Enrollment

Although enrollment cannot be predicted, the new campus is expected to attract more students from across the district and from the housing building on the campus, as well as serve more downtown businesses, residents and workers. In fall 2011, 5,831 students attended Lane classes at the old Downtown Center on Willamette, in the Wildish Building, and at other downtown locations.

Leased Space

  • The City of Eugene has leased ground floor space for public safety offices.

Occupancy

  • Maximum occupancy to meet building code standards is 2,671.

Operational Information

  • From September through June of each year the building is open from 7 AM to 10 PM Mondays through Fridays and as scheduled on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays
  • During the summer the building is scheduled for various events and programs; the Downtown Campus website will post details
  • College Public Safety officers are on duty at all times
  • Building maintenance and housekeeping are carried out by college employees
  • A centrally located elevator serves all floors and the rooftop